Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for March, 2008

reflection-nebula.jpg
(Reflection Nebula – NASA)

Welcome to the March 31, 2008 edition of a carnival of speculative fiction. Enjoy some very informative articles on publishing, macabre tales and more!

authors

Amy Grech presents Crimson Screams – Apple of My Eye Lipstik Indie Review posted at Amy Grech’s Horror Blog, saying, “Crimson Screams: The Official Blog of Horror Author Amy Grech”

Lincoln Crisler presents Our Shadows Speak Re-Release! posted at Lincoln Crisler : Despairs and Delights, saying, “This is the blog of author/editor Lincoln Crisler and is constantly updated with, amongst other things, updates on his fiction and anthologies.”

cross genre

Josef Assad presents The Banjo Players Must Die posted at Josef, or perhaps not, saying, “I thought there was a chance you might like this; it’s relesed online as Creative Commons, and it’s gotten over 10,000 downloads in the first 7 months!”

horror

Mike Philbin presents Mike Philbin’s Blog: the reader writer: posted at Mike Philbin’s Blog.

Kim Paffenroth presents Orpheus and the Pearl – Now Available for Preorder! posted at Gospel of the Living Dead, saying, “Updates on Kim Paffenroth’s horror fiction”

Jeffrey Thomas presents Fright(.com)fully Good! posted at Punktalk.

Aaron Powell presents The Hole: A Serial Novel of Supernatural Apocalypse by Aaron Ross Powell posted at The Hole: A Serial Novel, saying, “The Hole is a serial apocalyptic horror novel, based in Mormon mythology, about a global plague, zombies, and a small group of survivors making their way across a very weird Midwest.”

interviews

David Niall Wilson presents Cody Goodfellow Interviewed – a root chord of malign intellect posted at David Niall Wilson, saying, “Interview with horror author Cody Goodfellow – Lovecraftian horror with a modern twist…”

science fiction

CG Walters presents Spirit Story…an Old Genre Reawakening posted at Into the Mist, saying, “A path of communication with the subconscious—as opposed to a communication with the conscious mind—is alive, more a communion between the personal subconscious and the Collective Consciousness, possibly awakening or speaking to the personal consciousness a little along the way.”

Jesse presents Grey Survivors posted at Grey Survivors, saying, “A journal from a survivor of the invasion of earth.”

writers

Jason presents 1933: Giuseppe Zangara, who is not on Sons of Italy posters posted at Executed Today, saying, “My blog is historical, but this remembrance of the attempted assassination of FDR has helped key a couple of notable pieces of speculative “what might have been” fiction, including Dick’s “The Man in the High Castle” …”

writing

Mark Rainey presents Pitfalls posted at The Blog Where Horror Dwells, saying, “A few remarks about the dangers of falling for easy, alluring traps in the publishing business.”

eric cohen presents First in a series of chapters from a pulp novel posted at transgenderscripts.

Michael Arnzen presents Twisted Prompts for Sicko Writers posted at The Goreletter, saying, “Bram Stoker Award finalist Michael A. Arnzen posts the latest bizarrely stimulating creative writing prompts in his continuing “Instigation.””

Caroline Barnard-Smith presents Raw Offal, Bad Prawns and Rancid, Sweaty Cheese posted at Author or Bust.

That concludes this edition. Submit your blog article to the next edition of
a carnival of speculative fiction
using our
carnival submission form.
Past posts and future hosts can be found on our

blog carnival index page
.

Technorati tags:

, .

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

mafia.jpg
Buy M. A. F. I. A. at Borderlands Press

I recently did an interview with acclaimed horror writer Thomas F. Monteleone for the upcoming Maryland Writers’ Association Conference (it’s coming soon! I have to finish transcribing it/editing it on paper), and all around awesome guy that he is, after the interview was finished he offered to send me a copy of The Mothers and Fathers Italian Association. It’s the Borderlands Press omnibus collection of his “M. A. F. I. A.” column that has appeared in various publications over the years, currently at Cemetery Dance.

He asked me to let all you readers/writers out there know that you must have this book, and, frankly, he didn’t even need to ask! YOU MUST BUY THIS BOOK. Seriously, it covers so much about the publishing industry, how it’s changed over the years, the ups and downs he and others have gone through in the writing and publishing business. It’s an entertaining and very honest look at all of it, no bs.

There’s years and years of experience in “M. A. F. I. A.” and it’s all laid out for you to read and digest. Learn from it, wince when you recognize your own missteps (I most certainly did), and take comfort in the fact that it’s all a part of the process. If you really want to know, I suggest you get a copy ASAP.

I will refrain from using the The Godfather line to persuade you 🙂 .
Buy M. A. F. I. A. at Borderlands Press
# # #
Nancy O. Greene

Read Full Post »


If you visit here often you’ve probably seen the link to GoodSearch.com in the sidebar. I’ve been searching through there for a while now (it supplements my Google addiction 🙂 ) and I figured I should do a post about it.

Basically, GoodSearch allows you to raise money for non-profits by searching the Internet. It’s Yahoo-powered so you get the same results you would with Yahoo. I personally have to search a little differently with it than I do with Google, but it’s a pretty good search engine and I find that I’m using it more and more now. The also have a site, GoodShop, that allows you to do your online shopping through retailers like Amazon.com and raise money that way for non-profits. A larger % tends to go to the charity if you use GoodShop.

How it works:

You type in the name of a charity (it has to be US based, they don’t do overseas just yet) and click verify. If the group is in there, you can start searching, and $.01 goes to your organization of choice for every search you do. The money that goes to the charity comes from GoodSearch advertisers. And that’s pretty much it, but you can get a very detailed description from their website.

Here are some non-profits you can search for:

Heifer International on GoodSearch.
Their website.
(Heifer International is one of the best charitable organizations around. They help people to raise themselves out of poverty and hunger by providing livestock and education on building businesses with the tools they’re provided. Also, they have a “pass-it-along” model in which those that receive livestock give to their neighbors. For instance, if a family receives goats, they provide milk for neighbors and sell milk at the market. If a female goat gives birth, that one is given to a neighbor. They have many programs, and they’re all described fully on their site.)

Save Darfur on GoodSearch.
Their website.

From their site:

The Save Darfur Coalition was founded in 2004 when our organizational members signed a unity statement demanding peace and security for the people of Darfur. We are an alliance of over 180 faith-based, advocacy and humanitarian organizations. The Coalition’s member organizations represent 130 million people of all ages, races, religions and political affiliations united together to help the people of Darfur.

KIVA on GoodSearch.
Their website.

From their site:

How Kiva Works –
Step 1: Choose an entrepreneur
The loans on our site are always changing. They are being uploaded by our microfinance partners around the world. You can find a new loan on the home page or on the ‘Fundraising’ Loans page.

Step 2: Make a loan
When you have selected an entrepreneur, you can make a loan using your credit card (via PayPal). You can loan as little as $25 at a time. Checking out is easy and safe because of PayPal.

Step 3: Receive journals and payments
Periodically, you will hear back from the entrepreneur you sponsor. Partner representatives (often loan officers) write directly to the website to keep you informed on the progress of the entrepreneur. If you choose, you can receive these via email.

Step 4: Withdraw or re-loan
When your Kiva loan is repaid, you can choose to withdraw your funds or re-loan to a new entrepreneur.

# # #
Nancy O. Greene

Read Full Post »

arthur-c-clarke.jpg
As many have heard by now, the visionary, Sir Arthur C. Clarke, has passed away. His funeral was held on Saturday in Sri Lanka.

Arthur C. Clarke was a pioneer in literature, science, and humanitarian aid. He influenced generations with his novels, like the popular 2001: A Space Odyssey, which was made into the film directed by another visionary artist, Stanley Kubrick. If you would like to learn more about Arthur C. Clarke’s body of work and donate to his causes, such as the THE MILLENNIUM VILLAGE PROJECT in partnership with the Arthur C. Clarke Institute, please visit The Arthur C. Clarke Foundation.

2001-a-space-odyssey.jpg

Also, The Planetary Society will be broadcasting a tribute to Arthur C. Clarke starting today and continuing throughout the week.

Nancy O. Greene

Read Full Post »

PRESS RELEASE:
THE F. SCOTT FITZGERALD LITERARY CONFERENCE, INC.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Eric D. Goodman, Public Relations Director

DATE: March 17, 2008

EMAIL: edgewriter@gmail.com

Mary Gaitskill Headlines Authors at Fitzgerald Spring Event

Renowned author Mary Gaitskill will read from her work at the Spring Event of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Literary Conference. The event takes place at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, April 4 at the Rockville Vis Arts Center.

Mary Gaitskill has been nominated for the National Book Award, National Book Critics’ Circle Award and PEN/Faulkner Award. She is the author of Two Girls, Fat and Thin; Veronica; Bad Behavior; and Because They Wanted To. Her short story “Secretary” was made into a feature film.

Gaitskill will be joined by four local authors: Dave Housley (Ryan Seacrest is Famous), Nathan Leslie (Madre, Believers), Susan Muaddi-Darraj (The Inheritance of Exile), and Lalita Noronha (Where Monsoons Cry).

Don’t miss this rare opportunity to see Gaitskill and other talented authors read from their work. The event is free to members of the F. Scott Fitzgerald Literary Conference, Inc. and their guests, and the cost is $10 for the general public. There will be a minimal charge for students. Parking at Town Center is free after 7 p.m., and refreshments will be served.

For directions to the Vis Arts Center, visit www.visartscenter.org.

To learn more about this event or about the F. Scott Fitzgerald Literary Conference, Inc., email FSFconference@gmail.com or potomacrevieweditor@montgomerycollege.edu.

Read Full Post »

That’s the title of my new novel with Alan Solomon. Check out the foreward I wrote for it. I would be interested to hear feedback.

Hello all, the last time I started a blog to promote a book, it was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. So hence, here I am again, starting the journey once again with my co-writer who currently hails from Beijing, China. We’ve never met…or talked by phone. We’ve only emailed and instant messaged each other on GMail. A true novelty to be sure. You’ve read a bit of what the book is about, but here is more to ponder as we go through this journey together. Questions? email me at : TSim681157@aol.com . I look forward to hearing from you!

This book is lovingly and gently dedicated to those who struggle with the desire to abandon the intangible sense of differentness that lay so clumsily inside.

There are those who will understand the pain and grief that plagues the main character in this story. After all, one misfit can spot another instinctively. The uncomfortablness of living in one”s skin is a constant reminder of the lonliness of never being understood.

I”m not sure why some souls feel more isolated than others. The grip of being different is so tightly embedded inside those of us that the silence of peculiarity remains imprisoned. There is an all encompassing pain that endure from being different. I do not understand why this is. I simply know that I feel it too.

So, if you find yourself browsing through this book, your secret of being different has been discovered.

No worries, your secret is safe here.

**************************
Taryn Simpson – http://www.HePlayedtheGame.blogspot.com

Read Full Post »

It’s been pretty busy for me, personal wise and publishing wise, so instead of the usual thoughts on the writing life, I thought I’d post links to some actual stories I wrote. They’re all in the speculative/fantasy realm, but hey, they’re free and quick to read.

1) Light as Gossamer, published by Mytholog (www.mytholog.com), a webzine that’s sadly folded but still has its material online. The first story I ever published–a different take on the Cinderella story.

2) The Autumn Queen, also published by Mytholog. The Queen likes her tea hot.

3) Daughters of Sarah, published by Third Order Magazine (www.thirdorder.org). Story about a social worker confronting her past through non-existent women.

4) Crimson, published by Tales from the Moonlight Path(www.moonlit-path.com). A flash story that might not be about vampires.

5) Crowntree, published by Ideomancer (www.ideomancer.com). A coming-of-age story of a boy who realizes his friend is not who she seems to be.

I will also have stories published in upcoming issues of Poor Mojo’s Almanac(k) and The Town Drunk, so if you wish to be notified when they come out, subscribe to my blog, Cafe in the Woods. It’s always open and the food is mentally delicious…

Thanks for reading!

Read Full Post »

The short story form is something I have yet to master, yet it’s a form I love returning to again and again in my reading.  As Kurt Vonnegut once said, short stories are like “Buddhist catnaps.”  While even the bad ones can be a form of escapism from day to day activities and easily forgotten, some rise to the level of art and can be as complex, challenging, and unforgettable as the greatest of novels.

Having just finished reading James Joyce’s short story collection, Dubliners, I was inspired to create a brief list of the greatest short stories I’ve ever read.

1.  “The Dead” by James Joyce

2.  “The Basement Room” (aka “The Fallen Idol”) by Graham Greene

3.  “Two Soldiers” and “Shall Not Perish” by William Faulkner

4.  “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

5.  “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” by Edgar Allan Poe

I was also tempted to include “The Turn of the Screw” by Henry James, though that is officially considered a novella, and at 80 some odd pages, it is rather torturous to get through (which is part of the suspense of it all). 

What stories would make your list?

For more on James Joyce’s “The Dead” and my current reads, click below:

http://davethenovelist.wordpress.com/2008/03/01/bring-out-the-dead/

Read Full Post »